When Their Storm Meets Our Calm: The Art of Co-Regulation

 

Has your cheerful child ever quickly become a ball of tears when a near-by peer begins crying? Have you ever lost the pep in your step after spending time around a grumpy co-worker? This is because the feelings and behaviors of people in close proximity to us, directly impact how we feel, and respond to our own emotions. In the same way adults are impacted by others actions, children pick up the moods of others around them. However, being able to regulate emotions effectively and efficiently is not an innate skill. A child’s capacity to manage their big emotions relies on their brain development and their experiences. Therefore, when feeling upset or overwhelmed children look to their caregivers for help with regulating their emotions and appropriately respond to external stressors. Read More ›

Container Baby Syndrome: Why equipment-free exercise is best for your baby

 

What is “Container Baby Syndrome?”

Container Baby Syndrome is a “collection of movement, behavioral, and other problems caused by a baby or infant spending too much time in a container-any commonly used piece of baby equipment that resembles a container.” While this may sound intimidating, Container Baby Syndrome is highly preventable and there are many ways parents and caregivers can help children develop while avoiding this!

 

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Summer Sun Sensory Fun

 

It’s officially summertime in the Chi and we couldn’t be more excited! This perfect weather is practically begging our little ones to go outside and play. These fun, summer sensory rich activities are wonderful ways to engage our children’s tactile system and expose them to different scents, textures, and sensations. 

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The Importance of Free Play

 

What is Free Play?

Free play is when we allow children to have freedom to play in whatever and however way they want, with no direction from an adult (but adults are encouraged to participate from time to time!) They can choose their play materials and activities and how they engage with them. Choice is the crucial component for free play.

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Neurodiversity Means Natural Variety in the Human Brain

 

In recent years, it has become more recognized that a shift in societal perspectives is necessary for true inclusion, specifically regarding (but not limited to) autism and ADHD. Historically, autism and ADHD have been pathologized to focus on the way areas for growth impair a person’s “normalness”, rather than the constructive ways that individuals use their unique strengths. Neurodiverse children and adults do experience difficulties related to living in a world that is not accommodating and understanding of differences. The neurodiversity movement does not seek to trivialize how challenging growing up neurodiverse can be, but rather help focus on building shared understanding of the value neurodiverse individuals have just as they are.

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It’s Reflexive! Retained Reflexes and Their Effect on Development

 

Retained primitive reflexes are immature movement patterns that can often have effects on a child’s overall development. Naturally, these reflexes should “integrate” or disappear during infancy. When a reflex is retained, more mature movement patterns are not developed, which can have an effect on sensory integration, posture, executive functioning skills, and overall neuroplasticity. Recognizing and treating these retained reflexes can have a big impact on a child’s overall development. 

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Nighttime Anxiety and Sleep Disturbances: Putting Your Child’s Worries to Bed

 

As adults, we have all been there, it is past your “bedtime,” you are wide-eyed, staring at your ceiling and your thoughts are racing. The time flies by as you intermittently check your clock and countdown the hours until your alarm goes off in the morning, but something in you just will not let you fall asleep. Did you know that kids can experience the same type of nighttime anxiety that keeps them awake? They may not be able to identify their resistance to falling asleep as “anxiety” but parents and caregivers can teach their kids the tools they need to understand what is keeping them awake and how to address it.

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Increasing Communication Opportunities for Language Learners

We’ve all been there. Your language learner is indicating they want something. They might be crying, vocalizing, reaching for, or gazing at the item of their desire. As caretakers, we often anticipate their needs and are readily available to help. In this space between their indication and your response, however, is a great language learning opportunity. Our goal is to increase language use by: capitalizing on these organic moments, purposefully creating opportunities for communication, and providing models of language. Here are some helpful tips and tricks used in speech therapy sessions that can be used in the home and out in the community: 

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Spring Sensory Bins

With April showers comes May flowers, mud and gardening! As the weather becomes warmer and our time outside increases, here are a few sensory bin ideas that can target your child’s need for exploration and keep all their senses alert! Sensory bins are a great way to introduce your child to new sensory experiences from smells to various textures.

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