Phonological Processes: What are they and is my child using them?

Do you find yourself asking your child to repeat what they said, utilizing your detective skills to figure it out, or perhaps acting as your child’s commentator for people that are less familiar with their speech? We know that children can sometimes be difficult to understand when they are learning to speak. It can be tricky to know if this is part of typical development or if your child would benefit from support. In this post, we will help you understand phonological processes and their potential impact on your child’s overall speech intelligibility.

What is typical for intelligibility?

Intelligibility refers to the amount of speech that is readily understood by a listener. A good standard for how well children can be understood by their parents is as follows:

  • By 18 months, a child’s speech is typically 25% intelligible
  • By 24 months, a child’s speech is typically 50-75% intelligible
  • By 36 months, a child’s speech is typically 75-100% intelligible

What are phonological processes?

Phonological processes are predictable developmental patterns that children use to simplify their speech as they are learning to talk. Your child might use these patterns if they are not developmentally ready to coordinate all of the precise movements required for production of certain sounds or syllable shapes that are more complex. For example, your child might refer to a cookie as “tootie” or a banana as a “nana.” Depending on your child’s age and stage of development, the use of these processes can be considered typical or can indicate a need for further evaluation. The chart below (from Mommy Speech Therapy) outlines the different phonological processes, their definitions, examples of each, and the approximate age at which these processes are typically eliminated as part of development, beginning around age three.

http://mommyspeechtherapy.com/

When should I seek support?

If your child uses these processes in their speech for longer than expected, uses many different processes, and/or uses processes that are less typically seen in development, their overall intelligibility can be impacted, leading to difficulties being understood by adults, peers, and other communication partners. In this case, your child could benefit from evidenced-based, individualized support to facilitate acquisition of age-appropriate phonological skills.

What else can I do?

Your child’s speech-language pathologist can help to determine which phonological processes your child is currently using and whether or not therapeutic intervention is indicated. If so, your child’s therapist will develop individualized goals and implement an evidenced-based treatment approach. Your child’s therapist will work with you to establish a home practice program in order to facilitate generalization of skills learned in therapy across environments and communication partners. If your child does not yet have a speech-language pathologist and you are concerned about their overall intelligibility or use of phonological processes, please contact our office to schedule a screening or a full evaluation with one of our experienced clinicians.

 

Questions or concerns?

If you have questions or concerns about your child’s overall intelligibility or use of phonological processes, please contact us at info@playworkschicago.com or 773-332-9439.

 

Ana Thrall Burgoon, MS, CCC-SLP

Speech-Language Pathologist

 

References: Bowen, C. (2011). Table 1: Intelligibility. From Speech-Language-Therapy.com. Retrieved March 15, 2021.

Phonological Processes. From Mommy Speech Therapy. Retrieved from http://mommyspeechtherapy.com/wp-content/downloads/forms/phonological_processes.pdf. Retrieved March 15, 2021.

 

Photo Credit: Photo by Kindred Hues Photography on Unsplash

April Showers Bring Sensory Powers!

Not only do April showers bring May flowers, but with these rainy days also come the perfect opportunity to have your child engage in fun and exciting indoor sensory activities to get their creativity flowing!

At-Home Olympics

Photo Credit: PublicDomainPictures via Pixabay

Do you love watching the Olympics? Now you can create your own version at home! At home Olympics can be a creative and fun way to provide your child with proprioceptive input as well as vestibular input. Proprioception is the sensory system that allows our body to understand where we are in space through our joints. Have your child participate in tug-of-war challenges to squeezing pillow challenges to provide this input. The vestibular system allows our bodies to understand what orientation our body is in space, how fast we are moving, and in what direction. Creating challenges from animal walk races to long jumping challenges can provide your child with the vestibular input they are seeking!

Scavenger Hunts

Photo Credit: iheartcraftythings

Scavenger hunts are a great way to provide your child with sensory input when cooped up inside from the rain. Have your child go on a scavenger hunt for different colored items, textures, or even smells. Provide additional sensory input by using animal walks to search room to room for the hidden items!

Crunchy Snacks

Photo Credit: Foodlion

Rainy day munching with a movie or game night is a great opportunity to provide your child with sensory input! Have your child help you prepare a crunchy snack to target their various senses, from interacting with different textures and smells to proprioceptive input from the big crunch. The crunchier the snack the more sensory input to their mouth!

Questions or concerns?

If you have questions or concerns about your child’s responses to various sensory input, please contact us at info@playworkschicago.com or 773-332-9439.

Urooba Khaleelullah, MOT, OTR/L
Occupational Therapist