It’s Reflexive! Retained Reflexes and Their Effect on Development

 

Retained primitive reflexes are immature movement patterns that can often have effects on a child’s overall development. Naturally, these reflexes should “integrate” or disappear during infancy. When a reflex is retained, more mature movement patterns are not developed, which can have an effect on sensory integration, posture, executive functioning skills, and overall neuroplasticity. Recognizing and treating these retained reflexes can have a big impact on a child’s overall development. 

Read More ›

Nighttime Anxiety and Sleep Disturbances: Putting Your Child’s Worries to Bed

 

As adults, we have all been there, it is past your “bedtime,” you are wide-eyed, staring at your ceiling and your thoughts are racing. The time flies by as you intermittently check your clock and countdown the hours until your alarm goes off in the morning, but something in you just will not let you fall asleep. Did you know that kids can experience the same type of nighttime anxiety that keeps them awake? They may not be able to identify their resistance to falling asleep as “anxiety” but parents and caregivers can teach their kids the tools they need to understand what is keeping them awake and how to address it.

Read More ›

Increasing Communication Opportunities for Language Learners

We’ve all been there. Your language learner is indicating they want something. They might be crying, vocalizing, reaching for, or gazing at the item of their desire. As caretakers, we often anticipate their needs and are readily available to help. In this space between their indication and your response, however, is a great language learning opportunity. Our goal is to increase language use by: capitalizing on these organic moments, purposefully creating opportunities for communication, and providing models of language. Here are some helpful tips and tricks used in speech therapy sessions that can be used in the home and out in the community: 

Read More ›

Spring Sensory Bins

With April showers comes May flowers, mud and gardening! As the weather becomes warmer and our time outside increases, here are a few sensory bin ideas that can target your child’s need for exploration and keep all their senses alert! Sensory bins are a great way to introduce your child to new sensory experiences from smells to various textures.

Read More ›

Spot the Difference: Understanding Vision and Perception

 

Your child is sitting in the exam room chair for their annual eye check-up, and they are asked the notorious question that you always seem to overthink: “Which is better… 1… or… 2…” Did you know that optometrists are testing for visual acuity when they ask that question? But did you also know there are many more aspects of vision than just visual acuity that could be influencing your child’s ability to learn and play? Read on to learn more about how to spot the difference between visual skills!

Read More ›

Echolalia, Echolalia… What Do You Mean?

 

Like most things, the views on echolalia lie on a continuum. They range from considering its use non-functional, to tolerating it, to really accepting and celebrating it. We, as parents, caregivers, clinicians, and professionals, can facilitate further acceptance by understanding language learning differences, embracing echolalia, and educating others! 

Read More ›

Crawling, Can My Child Skip It?

 

Why is crawling such a big deal? What if my child doesn’t seem interested in crawling? These are all common questions that are brought up by parents. Crawling is much more than just a means of mobility. It provides a child with some important strengthening, coordination, and cognitive benefits that will help them much later than the baby and toddler years.  

Read More ›